Green Tea, Oxidized Fish Oil and 270 Fish

During 6 weeks, Iranian researchers were adding fish oil and green tea to diet of a hybrid of beluga and sterlet in order to find out whether a tea diet can compensate for potential harm from consuming oxidized fish oil. The fact is that fish oil is very susceptible to oxidation, especially when stored for a long time, and is often consumed (not only by fish, but also by humans) already oxidized. Short-term intake (for 10 days, for example) of oxidized fish oil, in principle, is safe, but a longer one may have side effects, for example, some negative effect on lipid metabolism.

270 fish divided in 27 fiberglass tanks were kept on one of nine diets composed of different dosage and combination of oxidized fish oil and green tea extract. In six weeks it was found that:

First, feeding with oxidized fish oil had no effects on fishes’ growth. Oh well. Second, growth indices improved slightly in fish fed green tea extract. Third, feeding with oxidized fish oil had negative effect on lipid metabolism. Forth, in fish that received both oxidized fish oil and green tea extract, negative changes in lipid metabolism were less significant. Based on these facts, scientists concluded that green tea extract has protective effects from the adverse effects of oxidized fish oil.

It is all so fine. But not as fine as the poeticity of the experiment itself. 270 fish. Fish oil. Green tea. A hybrid of beluga and sterlet…